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“Coming: A Rock Musical of Biblical Proportions” written by Erik Ransom. Interview by Maya Contreras.

The New York International Fringe Festival (FringeNYC) is the largest multi-arts festival in North America. It takes place annually in August over the course of two weeks on 20 stages spread across several Manhattan neighborhoods. FringeNYC (unlike other Fringe Festivals) uses a jury-based selection process to pick it’s 200 shows. One of those shows is “Coming: A Rock Musical of Biblical Proportions” written by Erik Ransom.

Maya Contreras: What is the name of your show?
Erik Ransom: "Coming: A Rock Musical of Biblical Proportions"

MC: What is it about?
ER: It’s about the Second Coming of Christ. He returns to Earth as an unassuming, wholesome kid named Josh Crenshaw who wants to spread a message of love and hope to the world. He decides the best platform for his message to reach his base is a televised singing competition called “American Icon”. Meanwhile, Damian Salt, a glam pop icon in the vein of Lady Gaga or David Bowie, is struck a blow by Christian extremists and declares war on God. The Glamageddon ensues!

MC: What made you want to write about this particular subject?
ER: I was considering the place Christian religion holds in modern American politics, and those people in power who seem to take the Bible very literally. There have been rumors that there is some cabal of politicians in Washington who make policy based on the assumption that we are living in the End Times and that The Rapture is imminent. I thought this was silly, so I wrote “Coming” as an attempt to literalize that idea and to put The Book of Revelation into contemporary language. Admittedly that language is irreverent and sardonic, and that endeavor turned into the glittery piece of passion-camp that we’ll be presenting in the New York International Fringe Festival this August!

MC: That was the biggest hurdle for you writing this piece?
ER: This was one of those (ironically) divine experiences, where I felt like a conduit through which the story was flowing. I know that sounds abysmally banal, but the first draft came out in five sleepless days. That first draft was sixty pages of text, including fourteen original songs. I think the biggest hurdle has been the revision process. It’s been honed a lot over the years and, being what it is, it changes with the trends. In the first reading the “American Icon” portion had a Simon Cowell-esque character, but the latest draft has a J. Lo.

MC: What did you enjoy most about the process of writing it?
ER: I really enjoyed finding the humor and creating quirky characters. Mining the Bible for dirty jokes and pop-culture references was a total blast, and since I was writing with no plan or outline, each new scene and song was a surprise to me. I remember sitting in my car waiting at a traffic light when I came up with the ending, and I could not wait to pull over and write down the idea while it was fresh!

MC: What does it mean to you to be a part of the New York Fringe Festival?
ER: It’s a thrilling, terrifying honor. When I got the acceptance e-mail my face was a comedy/tragedy mask. First I was like, “YAS!” Then I was like, “Oh wait, fundraising…” And, now that things are really moving along, I’m just over-the-moon at this opportunity to present this show to a brand new audience! It just means so much to me to have an opportunity to do this show at all, and the fact that it happens to be in an internationally renowned and respected festival in the world capital of musical theatre? Not too shabby!

MC: Where can we learn more about you and your show (e.g. website, twitter)?
ER: www.comingthemusical.com Twitter: @ComingMusical Facebook: www.facebook.com/comingthemusical

Proust Questionnaire:

What is your idea of perfect happiness?
To feel appreciated for the things I put out to the world, to be understood and for that to sustain me.

What is your greatest fear?
Irrevocable mistakes.

What is the trait you most deplore in yourself?
My inhibitions.

What is the trait you most deplore in others?
Inability to listen to/comprehend others.

Which living person do you most admire?
Richard Dawkins.

What is your greatest extravagance?
Eight inch platform fetish boots.

What is your current state of mind?
Excelsior.

What do you consider the most overrated virtue? Faith.

On what occasion do you lie?
When the truth offers no value:
Only cruelty.

What do you most dislike about your appearance?
Perpetual paunch.

Which living person do you most despise?
George W. Bush.

What is the quality you most like in a man?
Femininity.

What is the quality you most like in a woman?
Masculinity.

Which words or phrases do you most overuse?
“Sustained”, “I’ll allow it”.

What or who is the greatest love of your life?
My creative career.

When and where were you happiest?
On stage opening night of “Coming” in Philadelphia.

Which talent would you most like to have?
Piano proficiency.

If you could change one thing about yourself, what would it be?
My tendency toward excessive eating/drinking.

What do you consider your greatest achievement?
The creation of art that people believe in, care about and invest in.

If you were to die and come back as a person or a thing, what would it be?
A Habsburg.

Where would you most like to live?
Vienna, Austria.

What is your most treasured possession
?
Probably my iPhone, unfortunately.

What do you regard as the lowest depth of misery?

When one has literally nothing to look forward to.

What is your favorite occupation?
Performance!

What is your most marked characteristic?
Intense eyes.

What do you most value in your friends?
Ease of communication, intelligence, candor.

Who are your favorite writers?
Thomas Mann, George R. R. Martin, Jamie O’Neill

Who is your hero of fiction?
Daenerys Stormborn of House Targaryen.

Which historical figure do you most identify with?
Oscar Wilde.

Who are your heroes in real life?
The Three D’s. Richard Dawkins, Clarence Darrow, Charles Darwin.

What are your favorite names?
Damian, Aleric, Connor, Drake.

What is it that you most dislike?
To be regarded with condescension.

What is your greatest regret?
Non. Je ne regrette rien.

How would you like to die?
I wouldn’t.

What is your motto?
The duty of an artist is to lead an interesting life. The duty of a muse is to disappoint.

“DON’T PANIC: it’s only Finnegans Wake” written by Adam Harvey. Interview by Maya Contreras.

The New York International Fringe Festival (FringeNYC) is the largest multi-arts festival in North America. It takes place annually in August over the course of two weeks on 20 stages spread across several Manhattan neighborhoods. FringeNYC (unlike other Fringe Festivals) uses a jury-based selection process to pick it’s 200 shows. One of those shows is “DON’T PANIC: it’s only Finnegans Wake” written by Adam Harvey.

Maya Contreras: What is the name of your show?
Adam Harvey: DON’T PANIC: it’s only Finnegans Wake.

MC: What is it about?
AH: The whole of human existence as filtered and magnified through the mind-blowing prose of James Joyce.

MC: What made you want to write about this particular subject?
AH: Well to start, most of the show is by James Joyce, but it’s not enough to perform Finnegans Wake by itself - audiences get lost too easily, so I ease them into it with my own narrative, giving them anecdotes, personal stories, even the ocasional explanation or two.

MC: That was the biggest hurdle for you writing this piece?
AH: You have to know Finnegans Wake before you can write about it, and studying Finnegans Wake takes time. I’ve been at it for 20 years, and I still haven’t put it back up on the shelf.

MC: What did you enjoy most about the process of writing it?
AH: Discovering how much I have to say. I mostly see myself as a performer, not a writer, so that “virgin project glow” is still with me.

MC: What does it mean to you to be a part of the New York Fringe Festival?
AH: It’s a great honor of course, an honor that brings with it the obligation to put forward my absolute best work. Fringe Festivals are always mini sub-cultures, and if they are to thrive, their participants need to put their all into them.

MC: Where can we learn more about you and your show (e.g. website, twitter)?
AH: website: www.joycegeek.com twitter: @joycegeek facebook: JoyceGeek
kickstarter (good until July 13th.): https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1446126090/dontpanic

Read more interviews by Maya Contreras at thebloodlineofshadrickgrace.com & dirtydurty.com.

Proust Questionnaire:

What is your idea of perfect happiness? To see the advent of a language whose vocabulary and syntax are truly immune to the trappings of Orwellian Newspeak and sound-bite condensation. To quote Andre Gregory, “We need a language of the heart where language is no longer necessary.”

What is your greatest fear?
Cowards. Whenever I see one headed my way, I just can’t help it – I run away screaming.

What is the trait you most deplore in yourself?
My mono-lingualism. As much as I love to study other languages, I just can’t seem to fit anything other than English onto my tongue.

What is the trait you most deplore in others?
When they try to chew food and talk at the same time.

Which living person do you most admire? Noam Chomsky – master of language, master of the fine art of true honesty, and master of personal industry. May he live to see 100.

What is your greatest extravagance? My Joyce reading.

What is your current state of mind? Battling overwhelm as I work to mount my show. I actually manage this from time to time.

What do you consider the most overrated virtue?
Obedience, but that doesn’t mean it’s not a virtue.

On what occasion do you lie?
When the truth can only be misunderstood by whoever you’re lying to.

What do you most dislike about your appearance? I have no eyebrows.

Which words or phrases do you most overuse?
“Fuck,” “Shit,” “Goddammit,” “Mutherfucker,” “Cocksucker” etc.

What do you most value in your friends? Their compassion.

Which living person do you most despise?
Donald Rumsfeld, and not just for the reasons you might imagine. He was viciously rude to a dear friend of mine who works at an art gallery here in my hometown of Santa Fe. She’s among the sweetest people I’ve ever known, and he treated her like garbage – just because he could.

What is the quality you most like in a man?
A man is always at his best when he is in touch with the soft nurturing side of himself – the feminine side, if you will.

What is the quality you most like in a woman?
A woman is always at her best when she is in touch with the soft nurturing side of herself – the feminine side, if you will.

What or who is the greatest love of your life?
Good acting in a live setting. And by that term, I don’t mean “skilled” acting – you can get that just about anywhere. This is that thing that happens when when the moment being created is so real as to appear to be conceived in pure spontaneity. You forget you’re watching scripted dialogue and become thoroughly convinced that something real is happening right in front of you. Such an experience is as rare as it is indelible.

When and where were you happiest?
I can’t give actual coordinates – either temporal or spatial – but happiness for me is always associated with understanding. It comes at a very specific moment when disparate pieces that didn’t seem to fit together suddenly do. In such moments my whole system comes alive with the thrill of discovery.

Which talent would you most like to have?
A better facility for foreign languages.

If you could change one thing about yourself, what would it be?
My judgement in love relationships.

What do you consider your greatest achievement?
Rule #1: The harder you work for something, the greater your reward. This is why I found myself so attached to Finnegans Wake. Is memorizing over 100 pages of that book my greatest achievement? I hope not, but I suppose it can serve as a place-holder until I can make myself truly useful.

If you were to die and come back as a person or a thing, what would it be?
Something truly useful.

Where would you most like to live?
Home.

What is your most treasured possession?
My experiences.

What do you regard as the lowest depth of misery?
To be consumed by rage is the absolute depth of misery, for me or for anyone else.

What is your favorite occupation?
Sharing knowledge.

What is your most marked characteristic?
I suppose whatever the New York Times says about me. At this point, it would be that I have “an incredible memory.” If after this run it winds up being something less complimentary, I’ll be changing my answer, so stay tuned…

Who are your favorite writers?
Joyce, Beckett, Heaney, Nabokov, Melville, George Eliot, D.F. Wallace, and a bunch of others…

Who is your hero of fiction?
You just can’t beat Leopold Bloom of Ulysses. He may not be my favorite fictional character, but the requested quality here is ‘heroism,’ and Bloom simply takes the cake. Hardly a moment goes by in Ulysses where this man isn’t thinking imagintavely, holding tight vigil over his own egotism, or entertaining compassionate thoughts about whatever he may encounter on his day’s travels.

Which historical figure do you most identify with?
Antoine Lavoisier – inventor, experimenter, and yes, victim of his own complacency. A man who (I’d like to believe) lived all the way up until the moment he died.

Who are your heroes in real life?
Anyone who is willing to put their humanity on display - the same qualities that made me choose Bloom in Q#28. But I’d like to add a caveat to this whole hero business: As a general concept, heroism is at best ephemeral and at worst damaging. Real human beings invariably collapse from the weight of being called “hero.”

What are your favorite names?
Humphrey Chimpden Earwicker, Uriah Heep, and Zaphod Beeblebrox.

What is it that you most dislike?
The sound of cruelty can take days to shake out of my ears.

What is your greatest regret?
That I don’t have the courage to answer this question more candidly.

How would you like to die?
Peaceful and lucid, but only if I can say at the end of my life that I had earned such peace and lucidity. Of course, if I can say that at the end of my life, I don’t suppose the “how” really matters.

What is your motto?
There are two mottos that I use more often than any other: “Never overlook the obvious” and “People should be nice to each other.” Of course, this could be because people need to be reminded of these more than any other…

“a kind shot” written by Terri Mateer. Interview by Maya Contreras.

The New York International Fringe Festival (FringeNYC) is the largest multi-arts festival in North America. It takes place annually in August over the course of two weeks on 20 stages spread across several Manhattan neighborhoods. FringeNYC (unlike other Fringe Festivals) uses a jury-based selection process to pick it’s 200 shows. One of those shows is “a kind shot” written by and performed by Terri Mateer.

Maya Contreras: What is the name of your show?
Terri Mateer: "a kind shot".

MC: What is it about?
TM: Being 6 foot 1in the 6th grade, having a hippy mom, a surrogate father that looked like Basketball Jones and being a chick.

MC: What made you want to write about this particular subject?
TM: I wanted to help people.

MC: What was the biggest hurdle for you writing this piece?
TM: Scheduling time with my mentors. Finding structure with my many life stories. Editing.

MC: What did you enjoy most about the process of writing it?
TM: Working with my husband, Seth and Lee. Sharing it with audiences. Getting their feedback and re writing…

MC: What does it mean to you to be a part of the New York Fringe Festival?
TM: It means the world to me.

MC: Where can we learn more about you and your show (e.g. website, twitter)?
TM: www.terrimateer.com

Proust Questionnaire:

What is your idea of perfect happiness?
Having balance of love, work and play.

What is your greatest fear?
Being sick.

What is the trait you most deplore in yourself?
Being a bitch.

What is the trait you most deplore in others?
Bitchiness.

Which living person do you most admire?
My husband, Brian.

What is your greatest extravagance?
This Show.

What is your current state of mind?
Tired and creative.

What do you consider the most overrated virtue?
Purity.

On what occasion do you lie?
On the Palisades Parkway after getting pulled over from a cop.

What do you most dislike about your appearance?
My head.

Which living person do you most despise?
Hmmm…not sure I can despise.

What is the quality you most like in a man?
Humor.

What is the quality you most like in a woman?
Humor.

What or who is the greatest love of your life?
My husband.

Where would you most like to live?
In my home.

What is your most treasured possession? As for a thing, my home. As for my heart, my husband.

Which words or phrases do you most overuse?
Cool.

When and where were you happiest?

When Brian and I told each other at the same time…”I love you I love you I love you I want to spend the rest of my life with you.” (We got married 30 days later.)

Which talent would you most like to have?
ESP.

If you could change one thing about yourself, what would it be?
I’d like to have more faith and not worry so much.

What do you consider your greatest achievement?
Teaching a 6th grade girls’ French basketball team how to play defense and make free throws. They were all on the small side as far as stature and one time they were in an important game and they were down by 21 points….At half time I told them to play defense, make their free throws and if they stopped the big girl in the middle they had a chance. They won the game…in over time… with a free throw and got to travel all over Europe. (They had never been out of their back yard.)

If you were to die and come back as a person or a thing, what would it be?
A perennial sunflower or my cat…Pooter Poot.

What do you regard as the lowest depth of misery?
Having no one to talk to when you are in trouble.

What is your favorite occupation?
Acting.

What is your most marked characteristic?
Strong.

What do you most value in your friends?
Honesty.

Who are your favorite writers?
Christopher Durang, Adam Rapp, Theresa Rebeck, William Shakespeare, Sharr White.

Who is your hero of fiction?
Dr. Seuss.

Which historical figure do you most identify with?
Amelia Earhart.

Who are your heroes in real life?
Brian my husband, Seth and Lee at The Barrow Group.

What are your favorite names?
…??? As far as movies, singular names like JAWS, as far as food…lot’s of words like… Ben and Jerry’s Chocolate Chocolate Chip, for people…I like it when people look like their names.

What is it that you most dislike?
Bullshit.

What is your greatest regret?
That I did not go live with my mom the year she had cancer.

How would you like to die?
In my sleep.

What is your motto?
Keep going, have heart, play defense and make your free throws!

Read more interviews by Maya Contreras at thebloodlineofshadrickgrace.com & dirtydurty.com.

humansofnewyork:

"His grandmother and I are raising him. I worry about putting him into the public school system. I was a teacher for many years. I’ve seen so much confidence destroyed by the standardized system. Every human is born with natural curiosity. I’ve never seen a child who wasn’t inspired. But once you force someone to do anything, the inspired person is killed. I dropped out of school myself in 7th grade. So I know. I taught a GED course for years, so I’ve seen the end results over and over. I’ve seen so many kids who have complexes and insecurities because they were forced to do something they weren’t ready to do, and then they were blamed when they weren’t able to do it. What we call ‘education’ today is not organic. You can’t take something as complex as the human mind, compartmentalize it, and regiment its development so strictly."



Love this. xo Maya

humansofnewyork:

"His grandmother and I are raising him. I worry about putting him into the public school system. I was a teacher for many years. I’ve seen so much confidence destroyed by the standardized system. Every human is born with natural curiosity. I’ve never seen a child who wasn’t inspired. But once you force someone to do anything, the inspired person is killed. I dropped out of school myself in 7th grade. So I know. I taught a GED course for years, so I’ve seen the end results over and over. I’ve seen so many kids who have complexes and insecurities because they were forced to do something they weren’t ready to do, and then they were blamed when they weren’t able to do it. What we call ‘education’ today is not organic. You can’t take something as complex as the human mind, compartmentalize it, and regiment its development so strictly."

Love this. xo Maya

“A 1940’s Comedy of Errors” written by Michael Hagins. Interview by Maya Contreras.

The New York International Fringe Festival (FringeNYC) is the largest multi-arts festival in North America. It takes place annually in August over the course of two weeks on 20 stages spread across several Manhattan neighborhoods. FringeNYC (unlike other Fringe Festivals) uses a jury-based selection process to pick it’s 200 shows. One of those shows is “A 1940’s Comedy of Errors” written by Michael Hagins.

Maya Contreras: What is the name of your show?
Michael Hagins: A 1940’s Comedy of Errors.

MC: What is it about?
MH: A set of twins wreck havoc in the small town of Ephesus with mistaken identity and slapstick insanity.

MC: What made you want to write about this particular subject?
MH: I’m a huge fan of the 1940s, particularly the cartoons, and with my love of Shakespeare, I created the adaptation that stays true to the text but also brings the audience to the living cartoon world.

MC: What was the biggest hurdle for you writing this piece?
MH: Because I didn’t write the original material, the obstacle was more making sure my concept didn’t interfere with the themes and tones that Shakespeare wrote.

MC:
What did you enjoy most about the process of writing it?
MH: When I finally felt that I captured the spirit of Shakespeare’s comedy. Once I got I that point, the rest flowed easily.

MC: What does it mean to you to be a part of the New York Fringe Festival?
MH: It’s amazing. Last year was my first time, so this year I wanted to really raise the bar on the work, and impress a few people.

MC: Where can we learn more about you and your show (e.g. website, twitter)?
MH: www.Facebook.com/CAGETheatre

Read more interviews by Maya Contreras at thebloodlineofshadrickgrace.com & dirtydurty.com.

Proust Questionnaire:

What is your idea of perfect happiness?
Being able to truly be considered a success in theatre, someone of importance.

What is your greatest fear?
Natural water (pools, rivers, lakes, etc).

What is the trait you most deplore in yourself?
Paranoia.

What is the trait you most deplore in others?

Self-centered egoism.

Which living person do you most admire?
Sidney Poitier.

What is your greatest extravagance?
Video games.

What is your current state of mind?
Content in my career, but definitely not happy yet

What do you consider the most overrated virtue?
I don’t know. They all seem pretty good to me.

On what occasion do you lie?

I’m one to sugarcoat things when needed, to prevent hurt feelings

What do you most dislike about your appearance?
I definitely I could walk around shirtless and look like a Greek god.

Which living person do you most despise?
Despise is a strong word. There’s lot of racists out there I hate, but I don’t know them enough to despise.

What is the quality you most like in a man?
Humility.

What is the quality you most like in a woman?
Creativity.

Which words or phrases do you most overuse?
“Cool deal” and “Does that make sense?” are basically my catch phrases.

What or who is the greatest love of your life?
Theatre so far. Hopefully a female will change that one day.

When and where were you happiest?
I’d have to say most summers doing Shakespeare. Can’t pinpoint an exact time.

Which talent would you most like to have? Financial wizardry.

If you could change one thing about yourself, what would it be? I’d be better at raising money for shows.

What do you consider your greatest achievement?
Winning the playwright award for Planet Connections in 2013 for Hit and Match.

If you were to die and come back as a person or a thing, what would it be?
A knight in the Renaissance, although it may not be the cleanest…

Where would you most like to live?
New York City in a penthouse apartment.

What is your most treasured possession?

My 1920’s replica Tommy Gun.

What do you regard as the lowest depth of misery?

Monotonous existence with no creative outlet.

What is your favorite occupation?
Director.

What is your most marked characteristic?
Determination.

What do you most value in your friends?
Loyalty.

Who are your favorite writers?
Shakespeare, Sophocles, Ibsen.

Who is your hero of fiction?

Batman.

Which historical figure do you most identify with?

Shakespeare; although I swear I’m not being arrogant.

Who are your heroes in real life?
Martin Luther King, Jr., James Earl Jones, Page Deulin.

What are your favorite names?
Page, Devin, Emily.

What is it that you most dislike?
Failure.

What is your greatest regret?
A few friendships and relationships ended badly.

How would you like to die? Shot in the head at 90 directly after a show.

“BURBAGE…” written by Nick Minella. Interview by Maya Contreras.

The New York International Fringe Festival (FringeNYC) is the largest multi-arts festival in North America. It takes place annually in August over the course of two weeks on 20 stages spread across several Manhattan neighborhoods. FringeNYC (unlike other Fringe Festivals) uses a jury-based selection process to pick it’s 200 shows. One of those shows is “BURBAGE, The Man Who Made Shakespeare Famous” written by playwright Nick Minella.

Maya Contreras: What is the name of your show?
Nick Minella: “BURBAGE, The Man Who Made Shakespeare Famous”.

MC: What is it about?
NM: Richard Burbage who was perhaps the finest actor during Shakespeare’s time. We have very little knowledge of Elizabethan acting techniques, but we do know from Hamlet’s admonition to the players what Shakespeare, and presumably Burbage, thought constituted a bad melodramatic acting style, and we can infer from this that Burbage eschewed that style. What we do know about Burbage’s style is from a number of elegies written after his death. They praise his power of interpretation; he did not just act the parts he played, but became the parts he played, somewhat like today’s method acting technique, and the parts written for him are some of the greatest from Shakespeare’s pen. He played the title role in Hamlet, Othello, Richard III, and King Lear. His talents were also sought after by the other great playwrights at the time, including Ben Jonson and John Webster.
He could also lay claim to coming from England’s first theatrical family. His father, James Burbage, formed the first professional acting troupe licensed to perform in England, and the older Burbage also built “The Theatre,” London’s first playhouse. Richard Burbage was not just an actor, he was also a renowned artist and there is a claim that he painted the famous Chandos portrait of Shakespeare. He and his brother Cuthbert also took over the management of The Theatre after their father’s death and later rebuilt it as the famous Globe Theater.

MC: What made you want to write about this particular subject?
NM: I wrote it especially for my friend Neil McGarry, a great stage actor with a list of credits that Richard Burbage would be proud to have. Neil founded his acting company The Bay Colony Shakespeare Company in part for the purpose of producing the play. There have been three successful productions of the play, the first at the 2010 Sagamore Beach Colony Club’s “Arts On the Beach” festival. Its next appearance was in January 2013 at the Boston Playwrights’ Theatre; and then in February 2013 at the Cotuit Center for The Arts.

MC: What was the biggest hurdle for you writing this piece?
NM: Getting the language to sing. I wrote about 11 rewrites, cutting and adding scenes, working to get a rhythm to the language, which I believe must be simple, direct, but which must sing. I strive for this “singing” in all my works. For this play, I didn’t want to write in iambic pentameter and I didn’t want to use too many Shakespearean quotes, I wanted a language that sounded true, but was not an imitation of Elizabethan English.

MC: What did you enjoy most about the process of writing it?
NM: The writing. I love Shakespearean theater, its storytelling, English history, and the Elizabethan age in particular, so the research was a joy. I am also at my most contented when I am writing. I have no sense of time when I am at it and I am surprised when I realize that I’ve spent 3, 4, or more hours at it. And I am not alone when I write, my characters are with me, I live with them and for them and I am loathed to part from them when fatigue forces me to put down the pen.

MC: What does it mean to you to be a part of the New York Fringe Festival?
NM: Everything. It is a confirmation for me that I have some talent as a writer and it gives me confidence to continue writing. It is justification of my friend Neil’s commitment to me and to the play. It is also an opportunity for us to present the play to a New York audience (something every playwright dreams of), at one of the most prestigious theatrical festivals. Who wouldn’t gladly give 10 year from his life for a chance to be presented by the Fringe Festival?

MC: Where can we learn more about you and your show (e.g. website, twitter)?
NM: At the New York International Fringe website: http://www.fringenyc.org/, and at The Bay Colony Shakespeare Company’s website: www.baycolonyshakespear.com.

PROUST QUESTIONNAIRE:
What is your idea of perfect happiness?

Doing what I enjoy doing.

What is your greatest fear?
Being alone in life.

What is the trait you most deplore in yourself?
Lack of self confidence.

What is the trait you most deplore in others?
Selfishness.

Which living person do you most admire?
Any person who respects the rights of others.

What is your greatest extravagance?
Pampering my own ego.

What is your current state of mind?
My mind is in a constant state of flux.

What do you consider the most overrated virtue?
Modesty.

On what occasion do you lie?
To protect others.

What do you most dislike about your appearance?
Anything I cannot change.

Which living person do you most despise?
Any person who is cruel and vindictive.

What is the quality you most like in a man?
His feminine side.

What is the quality you most like in a woman?
Her independence.

Which words or phrases do you most overuse?
“If I only had (hadn’t) done …”

What or who is the greatest love of your life?
I won’t want to embarrass that person.

When and where were you happiest?

When I was a child.

Which talent would you most like to have?
The talent for self-promotion.

If you could change one thing about yourself, what would it be?
The century I was born.

What do you consider your greatest achievement?
My belief in God and man in face of adversity.

If you were to die and come back as a person or a thing, what would it be?
A pampered, spoiled, cat living with a rich family.

Where would you most like to live?
Near people who love me.

What is your most treasured possession?
My family and friends.

What do you regard as the lowest depth of misery?
When you have no goal to accomplish.

What is your favorite occupation?
Reading, writing, and music.

What is your most marked characteristic?
Shyness.

What do you most value in your friends?
Instinctively knowing when I need them.

Who are your favorite writers?
I love the author I am reading at any given time.

Who is your hero of fiction?
Anyone who fights against injustice.

Which historical figure do you most identify with?
Anyone who has stood up against injustice.

Who are your heroes in real life?
Anyone who contributes to the education, well-being, and happiness of the world.

What are your favorite names?
Names do not matter. A rose by any other name would smell as sweet.

What is it that you most dislike?
Being alone in the night.

What is your greatest regret?
Holding back my emotions.

How would you like to die?
Loved and admired.

What is your motto?
That would be telling you too much about myself.


Read more interviews by Maya Contreras at thebloodlineofshadrickgrace.com & dirtydurty.com.

“The Text Of Sex” written by Michele Aldin Kushner Interview by Maya Contreras.

The New York International Fringe Festival (FringeNYC) is the largest multi-arts festival in North America.  It takes place annually in August over the course of two weeks on 20 stages spread across several Manhattan neighborhoods. FringeNYC (unlike other Fringe Festivals) uses a jury-based selection process to pick it’s 200 shows. One of those shows is “The Text Of Sex” written by playwright Michele Aldin Kushner.

Maya Contreras: What is the name of your show? Michele Aldin Kushner:  The Text of Sex. 

MC: What is it about? MAK: THE TEXT OF SEX is about A NYC Prep School student, Delilah, who’s arrested for sexing her boyfriend when her nude shot goes viral.  Her father wants Delilah to give up the name the boy.  Her best friend, who convinced her to take the photo, wants Delilah to dump the boy.   Her exasperated mother wants Delilah to stop using her cell phone to communicate.  Delilah wants the school, the District Attorney, and her parents to know that they all misunderstand her – more than they realize. 

MC: What made you want to write about this particular subject?MAK: I think it’s extraordinary that kids are growing up and exploring their sexuality with the technology of the Internet and mobile computer (the cell phone).  Who wouldn’t?    Adults are addicted to cell phones and texting.  Children only follow their parents’ example.   But kids are being penalized for using what is pervasive and at their disposal.  Of course the legal system gets involved when something like sexting disrupts a school or community.  However, our legal system has not caught up with our current conundrum of children behaving like adults.  And in New York State a child of sixteen can be arrested for sexting: disseminating pornography to other underage children.   This very law that is meant to protect kids is currently being used to prosecute them.  That being said – I really wanted to write a story that includes the teen point of view – which – I think  - still includes a place of innocence.

MC: What was the biggest hurdle for you writing this piece?MAK: In writing THE TEXT OF SEX, I consulted with lawyers, including a NY District Attorney.   I researched New York State laws on sexting/pornography charges regarding children, and continue to keep up with the many news pieces posted on teen sexting.   However – my biggest challenge in writing this piece is asking the audience to accept the legal devices I chose to use in order to keep the play theatrical.  
My second hurdle has been conveying that this is not a criminal procedure TV show (but I love those) or an after school special.   It’s very much a play – designed to challenge all audiences, adults and teens; how do you cope with omnipresent technology?  

MC: What did you enjoy most about the process of writing it?MAK: I liked allowing the dad of the family to portray himself as the biggest a**hole possible  (I tend to rally against the necessity of writing likeable characters in general).  I liked writing his rants at his wife and child and pretty much anyone with whom he comes into contact.  Because it felt perfectly justified.  He is a man working to keep his head financially above water, isolated from his family, and heading for a breakdown.  

MC: What does it mean to you to be a part of the New York Fringe Festival?MAK: I’m proud!   This is my third time producing one of my shows for FringeNYC.  Fringe has given me the opportunity to show my work on a larger platform, in great theatres in front of great audiences and allows me to be a part of a larger movement of theatre – one in which people get to re-create the story they wish to tell.

MC: Where can we learn more about you and your show (e.g. website, twitter)?MAK: Please check us out at www.textofsex.com -  @textofsex – www.fringenyc.orgwww.michelealdinkushner.com

Read more interviews by Maya Contreras at thebloodlineofshadrickgrace.com & dirtydurty.com.

“The Text Of Sex” written by Michele Aldin Kushner Interview by Maya Contreras.

The New York International Fringe Festival (FringeNYC) is the largest multi-arts festival in North America. It takes place annually in August over the course of two weeks on 20 stages spread across several Manhattan neighborhoods. FringeNYC (unlike other Fringe Festivals) uses a jury-based selection process to pick it’s 200 shows. One of those shows is “The Text Of Sex” written by playwright Michele Aldin Kushner.

Maya Contreras: What is the name of your show?
Michele Aldin Kushner: The Text of Sex.

MC: What is it about?
MAK: THE TEXT OF SEX is about A NYC Prep School student, Delilah, who’s arrested for sexing her boyfriend when her nude shot goes viral. Her father wants Delilah to give up the name the boy. Her best friend, who convinced her to take the photo, wants Delilah to dump the boy. Her exasperated mother wants Delilah to stop using her cell phone to communicate. Delilah wants the school, the District Attorney, and her parents to know that they all misunderstand her – more than they realize.

MC: What made you want to write about this particular subject?
MAK: I think it’s extraordinary that kids are growing up and exploring their sexuality with the technology of the Internet and mobile computer (the cell phone). Who wouldn’t? Adults are addicted to cell phones and texting. Children only follow their parents’ example. But kids are being penalized for using what is pervasive and at their disposal. Of course the legal system gets involved when something like sexting disrupts a school or community. However, our legal system has not caught up with our current conundrum of children behaving like adults. And in New York State a child of sixteen can be arrested for sexting: disseminating pornography to other underage children. This very law that is meant to protect kids is currently being used to prosecute them. That being said – I really wanted to write a story that includes the teen point of view – which – I think - still includes a place of innocence.

MC: What was the biggest hurdle for you writing this piece?
MAK: In writing THE TEXT OF SEX, I consulted with lawyers, including a NY District Attorney. I researched New York State laws on sexting/pornography charges regarding children, and continue to keep up with the many news pieces posted on teen sexting. However – my biggest challenge in writing this piece is asking the audience to accept the legal devices I chose to use in order to keep the play theatrical.
My second hurdle has been conveying that this is not a criminal procedure TV show (but I love those) or an after school special. It’s very much a play – designed to challenge all audiences, adults and teens; how do you cope with omnipresent technology?

MC: What did you enjoy most about the process of writing it?
MAK: I liked allowing the dad of the family to portray himself as the biggest a**hole possible (I tend to rally against the necessity of writing likeable characters in general). I liked writing his rants at his wife and child and pretty much anyone with whom he comes into contact. Because it felt perfectly justified. He is a man working to keep his head financially above water, isolated from his family, and heading for a breakdown.

MC: What does it mean to you to be a part of the New York Fringe Festival?
MAK: I’m proud! This is my third time producing one of my shows for FringeNYC. Fringe has given me the opportunity to show my work on a larger platform, in great theatres in front of great audiences and allows me to be a part of a larger movement of theatre – one in which people get to re-create the story they wish to tell.

MC: Where can we learn more about you and your show (e.g. website, twitter)?
MAK: Please check us out at www.textofsex.com - @textofsex – www.fringenyc.org
www.michelealdinkushner.com

Read more interviews by Maya Contreras at thebloodlineofshadrickgrace.com & dirtydurty.com.

"The Road to Odessa." written by Cameron Mckenzie. Interview by Maya Contreras.

The New York International Fringe Festival (FringeNYC) is the largest multi-arts festival in North America. It takes place annually in August over the course of two weeks on 20 stages spread across several Manhattan neighborhoods. FringeNYC (unlike other Fringe Festivals) uses a jury-based selection process to pick it’s 200 shows. One of those shows is “The Road to Odessa.” written by playwright Cameron Mckenzie.

Maya Contreras: What is the name of your show?
Cameron Mckenzie: The Road to Odessa.

MC: What is it about?
CM: Its about loneliness in men and the subversive types exploitation we commit to women. For me it started with a thought “Wouldn’t this be easier if I just went and got a mail order bride” and the show is an exploration of that. Its also about lost love and family.

MC: What made you want to write about this particular subject?
CM: To tell the truth I was looking for a topic to write a show about and when I had the thought about mail order brides it seemed like a good idea. I started writing it and my brother Richard who is a comedian read it and said he just wanted to watch a show about who I am when it comes to love and loss. And then I really started questioning who I was as a man today and that’s when the play genuinely started for me.
It really sparked question of what is loneliness in the male condition and what does it do to me and the people around me. It tells the story of a journey towards getting a mail order bride but to me its really about love and family and humanity and seeing the good and evil in me and other people.

MC: What was the biggest hurdle for you writing this piece?
CM: There has been so many its hard to find a place to begin. Technically its a very ambitious show. I built a camera that shoots video in 360 degree which I was going to use to interview women in the Ukraine but I could find anyone to talk to so I have integrated it into the show in another way which looks like it is working, fingers crossed.
Also making the story an actual cohesive story and not just a indulgent rant about me has been very challenging. Finding something to say about the topic from a unique perspective has required a lot of work. Its funny because I spent so much time trying to plot this story out when all it really required was for me to talk from the heart about my life as a man. I was very concerned that this was all just a self indulgent wank about which is why getting picked up by the NYC Fringe has been such a boost in confidence that I am on a good path with it.

MC: What did you enjoy most about the process of writing it?
CM: All of it, absolutely all of it. I have been an actor for a very long time and that process to me has always felt like work. Work that I have a passion for but work none the less. Writing, particularly writing this has just been such a stimulating thing that even the challenges have been nothing short of fun a kind of anxious stressful fun.

MC: What does it mean to you to be a part of the New York Fringe Festival?
CM: So much! Its given me such a great sense of validation. Its made me believe that I have something to offer as a performer and a writer. I think when someone goes though the process of applying to do something in the arts it seems like such a long shot and it drags up memories of when people said that you weren’t good at things. I always think these thing are a long shot because a primary school teacher of mine said that I couldn’t spell Christmass like the other kids. So when I got the acceptance email from Elena I kinda jumped for joy literally in my lounge room.

MC: Where can we learn more about you and your show (e.g. website, twitter)?
CM: There is the fringe website but I also have a website for my theatre company which is www.goodlittletheatre.com. I don’t know how to use twitter. I think I’m a 80 year old man trapped in a 33 year olds body.

PROUST QUESTIONNAIRE:
What is your idea of perfect happiness? Going surfing on a cold day and then sitting down in the shower.

What is your greatest fear? Becoming paralysed and also anything else that can hurt me.

What is the trait you most deplore in yourself? I do get scared about all the bad stuff that can happen in life. It tries to stop me from living and trying and sometimes I let it.

What is the trait you most deplore in others? Narrow mindedness and violence. I also can’t stand slow walkers.

Which living person do you most admire?
My best friend Pat who never thinks of himself and is always there for me when I get scared.

What is your greatest extravagance? Having really long showers. I can’t help myself. The second water its me I just go to a happy place and come out the other end loving life a bit more but its a massive waste of water.

What is your current state of mind? Anxious stressed and happy so I would say Anxstressappy.

What do you consider the most overrated virtue? Australian larrikinism (a type of charm) which should be a virtue but often justifies bullshit behaviour.

On what occasion do you lie? When the truth will hurt someone but then the lie ends up hurting them.

What do you most dislike about your appearance? I think my jaw is a bit crooked also I can’t grow facial hair which is horrible.

Which living person do you most despise? My best friend Pat who is an economic girly-man that sucks at playing Halo and annoys me about crumbs.

What is the quality you most like in a man? Friendliness.

What is the quality you most like in a woman?
Kindness.

Which words or phrases do you most overuse? Bam! and Geez Louise and Holy Shit Balls!

What or who is the greatest love of your life? This is going to sound cheesy but I would have to say surfing and the ocean.

When and where were you happiest? When my niece called me Uncle Cam for the first time.

Which talent would you most like to have? Writing and Performing.

If you could change one thing about yourself, what would it be? I have a massive fear of dancing that I want to get over.

What do you consider your greatest achievement?
Making it past 30 with my mind intact.

If you were to die and come back as a person or a thing, what would it be? A really smart rescue dog who saves people and has also found a way to open cookie jars.

Where would you most like to live? On the coast in the Netherlands with a fireplace and a dog and a wife and kids and the rest of my family and Pat.

What is your most treasured possession?
My camera that films in 360 degrees because it took such a long time to work out how to make. Also my car and surfboards.

What do you regard as the lowest depth of misery? When I thought I had MS and when my dad passed away.

What is your favourite occupation? Writing and performing particularly when it takes me on an adventure.

What is your most marked characteristic? Forgetfulness and an obsession with sugar.

What do you most value in your friends? Help and companionship.

Who are your favorite writers? I don’t really read a lot but I love Robert Graves, Edward Albee and Arthur C Clark.

Who is your hero of fiction? It has to be Batman or the dog from UP!

Which historical figure do you most identify with?
When I was in high-school my teacher told us about this guy in ancient China who wouldn’t give up on trying to get an education. He was finally accepted into that Dynasties version of university when he was an old man. I love the fact that he never gave up on what he wanted for himself.

Who are your heroes in real life? My mum who is the absolute boss! And my dad.

What are your favourite names? Cameron, Richard, Scott, Jess, Eva, Adam and Pat.

What is it that you most dislike? Hurtful people and when I’m a hurtful person.

What is your greatest regret? Not getting back on a train.

How would you like to die? During interstellar travel.

What is your motto? Fuck it!

Read more interviews by Maya Contreras at thebloodlineofshadrickgrace.com & dirtydurty.com.

"Confessions of Old Lady #2" written by Joan Shepard. Interview by Maya Contreras.

The New York International Fringe Festival (FringeNYC) is the largest multi-arts festival in North America. It takes place annually in August over the course of two weeks on 20 stages spread across several Manhattan neighborhoods. FringeNYC (unlike other Fringe Festivals) uses a jury-based selection process to pick it’s 200 shows. One of those shows is
“Confessions of Old Lady #2” written by playwright Joan Shepard.

Maya Contreras: What is the name of your show?
Joan Shepard: Confessions of Old Lady #2.

MC: What is it about?
JS: My life in show business— 74 years so far.

MC: What made you want to write about this particular subject?
JS: For many years my friends had been telling me to set my story down on paper. I took a writing class in solo performance. The 12th Night Club asked me to tell the story of my life as an evening’s entertainment at the club. I decided it was time to make it into a one woman show.

MC: What was the biggest hurdle for you writing this piece?
JS: Selecting what stories to tell and making it sound spontaneous, rather than literary.

MC: What did you enjoy most about the process of writing it?
JS: How easy it was once I got started.

MC: What does it mean to you to be a part of the New York Fringe Festival?
JS: Honored to be asked.

MC: Where can we learn more about you and your show (e.g. website, twitter)?
JS: On twitter (@joanhshepard), on my facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/joanhaydenshepard), on google (as both Joan Shepard and Joan Shepard Thompson), and soon on my website.

PROUST QUESTIONNAIRE:

What is your idea of perfect happiness?
To do a terrific show and go out afterwards with family and friends.

What is your greatest fear?
Being physically unable to perform.

What is the trait you most deplore in yourself?
Putting things off— procrastination.

What is the trait you most deplore in others?
Blaming.

Which living person do you most admire?
Barack Obama.

What is your greatest extravagance?
Taking taxis.

What is your current state of mind?
Worrying over everything. As I once told my husband, “I have to worry, it’s my hobby.”

What do you consider the most overrated virtue?
Honesty as in “let me be honest”, usually a cover-up for a hurtful personal remark.

On what occasion do you lie?

On all occasions when the truth might hurt and do no good anyway.

What do you most dislike about your appearance?
My big bloobully stomach.

Which living person do you most despise?
George W Bush.


What is the quality you most like in a man?
Humor.

What is the quality you most like in a woman?
Humor.

Which words or phrases do you most overuse?

“I have a story about that”.

What or who is the greatest love of your life?
What: The Theatre. Who: Evan Thompson.

When and where were you happiest?
In 1951 I was a student at the Preparatory Academy for the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art. For the first time in my life I was totally accepted by my peers, and at the same time immersed in English theatre. In 1959 I was appearing in a hit show and getting married to Evan. There have been many, many happy times since but these two are standouts.

Which talent would you most like to have?
Computer skills.

If you could change one thing about yourself, what would it be?
To stop holding grudges and resisting change.

What do you consider your greatest achievement?
Playing a major role in saving the Ivoryton Playhouse in Connecticut from the wrecking ball.

If you were to die and come back as a person or a thing, what would it be?
A boy player in Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre.

Where would you most like to live?
Where I am right now, in Manhattan’s East Village, but London wouldn’t be bad and there’s also Commerce Street in the West Village.

What is your most treasured possession?
My Steinway parlor grand piano. My father bought it for me before I was born, so it is 82 years old.

What do you regard as the lowest depth of misery?
The Holocaust. I still feel guilty when I read the dates and remember how happy I was then.

What is your favorite occupation?
Being in a play.

What is your most marked characteristic?
Others have said it’s my energy but it is somewhat diminished.

What do you most value in your friends?
Humor.

Who are your favorite writers?
Shakespeare, Gerard Manley Hopkins, Norah Lofls and Alexander McCall Smith.

Who is your hero of fiction?
Jim Hawkins.

Which historical figure do you most identify with?
Abigail Adams.

Who are your heroes in real life?
Real life? Never heard of it.

What are your favorite names?
For girls: Emily, Charlotte and Jennifer. For boys: Owen and Jeremy.

What is it that you most dislike?
Being out of work.

What is your greatest regret?
Being mean to my mother the night before she died.

How would you like to die?
To give a terrific performance on stage, go to my dressing room and lay my head down on the table.

What is your motto?
Try and stop me!

Read more interviews by Maya Contreras at thebloodlineofshadrickgrace.com & dirtydurty.com.

"Dragon’s Breath" written by Michael C. O’Day. Interview by Maya Contreras.

The New York International Fringe Festival (FringeNYC) is the largest multi-arts festival in North America. It takes place annually in August over the course of two weeks on 20 stages spread across several Manhattan neighborhoods. FringeNYC (unlike other Fringe Festivals) uses a jury-based selection process to pick it’s 200 shows. One of those shows is “Dragon’s Breath” written by playwright Michael C. O’Day.

Maya Contreras: What is the name of your show?
Michael C. O’Day: Dragon’s Breath.

MC: What is it about?
O’Day: It’s about a YA paranormal romance writer who accidentally creates an evil cult.

MC: What made you want to write about this particular subject?
O’Day: Short answer: the election of Pope Francis.
A more elaborate answer: Despite not being Catholic, it drove me nuts when all the commentators who were surprised at the election of the current Pope kept wondering what the choice could possibly mean. (Lookin’ your way, Chris Matthews.) In South America, the chief rival to the traditional Catholic church is the conservative envangelical movement. And the whole tenor of Francis’ papacy so far – a return to a classically liberal, socially-oriented, common-sense approach to religion – makes sense in that context. As a response against the excesses of religious fundamentalist movements that re-write the holy texts they claim to worship. And I realized all that at the time of his election. And as I watched that coverage, a thought struck me – what if that exact same schism happened, not with the Bible, but with the most ridiculous book imaginable? With, for example, a YA paranormal romance series? Featuring dragons?

MC: What was the biggest hurdle for you writing this piece?
O’Day: Since the play is about the writing and promotion of a series of YA novels, I had to figure out what the plot of the books were and weave that plot into the play without overwhelming the story I was actually telling. And I had to do all that with my cat lying on my keyboard the whole time.

MC: What did you enjoy most about the process of writing it?
O’Day: Having an excuse to binge-read fantasy novels for three months straight. For “research.”

MC: What does it mean to you to be a part of the New York Fringe Festival?
O’Day: Given the insane costs of producing theatre in New York, and the ridiculous levels of bureaucracy and development involved in creating new work, the Fringe is the last truly democratic forum for getting your artistic voice heard. I feel honored to be included in it.

MC: Where can we learn more about you and your show (e.g. website, twitter)?
O’Day: Our website is www.dragonsbreathplay.com. You can also find us on Facebook (“Dragon’s Breath”) and Twitter (@Drag0nsBreath).

PROUST QUESTIONNAIRE:

What is your idea of perfect happiness? Being able to create something and know that it matters.

What is your greatest fear? That it was all a waste.

What is the trait you most deplore in yourself?
Indecisiveness.

What is the trait you most deplore in others?
Willful ignorance.

Which living person do you most admire?
Arthur French. He’s a founding member of the Negro Ensemble Company, he’s still a working actor and director and has taught just about every actor in New York City, and I don’t know anybody with more talent or a greater work ethic, or who’s a better role model for an arts professional.

What is your greatest extravagance?
I’m an actor! Pizza that costs more than a buck a slice is an extravagance!

What is your current state of mind?
My brain feels like oatmeal these days. Is oatmeal a state of mind?

What do you consider the most overrated virtue? Patience. Sometimes shit just has to get done.

On what occasion do you lie? Only if my life’s on the line – I’m really bad at it.

What do you most dislike about your appearance? At my age, I can’t answer that without crying.

Which living person do you most despise?
Who’s on the news right now?

What is the quality you most like in a man?
The ability to resist the temptation to prove they’re the alpha.

What is the quality you most like in a woman?
An indulgent sense of humor.

Which words or phrases do you most overuse?
I object to the question. It’s not possible to overuse “awesome-tastic.”

What or who is the greatest love of your life?
Ludwig van Beethoven. In a totally hetero bro-mance kind of way.

When and where were you happiest?

Waiting in the calm blue light backstage of the shows I did in college.

Which talent would you most like to have?
At the moment, the ability to stop time would come in pretty damn handy.

If you could change one thing about yourself, what would it be?
I’d be better with people. Whatever the heck that means.

What do you consider your greatest achievement? Getting out of the 1980s.

If you were to die and come back as a person or a thing, what would it be? An octopus. They’re going to inherit the earth, mark my words.

Where would you most like to live? A parallel-universe New York City that was actually affordable.

What is your most treasured possession? My grandfather’s Gibson Black Special guitar. He bought it in Madison, Wisconsin at the height of the Depression, and it survived the twentieth century. It’s scratched up and I can only play two or three chords at best, but it was my grandfather’s, and now it’s mine.

What do you regard as the lowest depth of misery? Having nothing meaningful to do, and an endless expanse of time in which to do it.

What is your favorite occupation? Ancient Celtic bard. They were the lawmakers and lorekeepers of their world, and if they made up a satire about you, you dropped dead if you heard it. We need an MFA program for that.

What is your most marked characteristic?
Geekiness in all its forms.

What do you most value in your friends?
A high degree of tolerance.

Who are your favorite writers?
Dostoyevsky, Shakespeare, Ben Jonson, Ray Bradbury, Christopher Durang. (Crap, that’s a whole bunch of white guys. Sorry.)

Who is your hero of fiction? Sherlock Holmes. The REAL one.

Which historical figure do you most identify with? Is it too early to consider Joe Biden a historical figure?

Who are your heroes in real life? Whaddaya mean the Ghostbusters aren’t real?!?!

What are your favorite names? In the interest of self-promotion, I’m going with “Tabitha Wonderley.” (Come see the show and you’ll understand.)

What is it that you most dislike? Garden slugs. Seriously. YUCK.

What is your greatest regret? That it’s taken so long for me to understand things that should be intuitive enough for a child to grasp.

How would you like to die? Incinerated by a nuclear device that I’m flying away from a heavily populated area in order to save the population, like at the end of The Dark Knight Rises. (That lousy coda doesn’t count.)

What is your motto? “One of us! One of us! Gooble gabble, one of us!”

Read more interviews by Maya Contreras at thebloodlineofshadrickgrace.com & dirtydurty.com.