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DDD: You mentioned that “I intensely dislike the way that woman are often portrayed in popular culture, and try to fight that in my own work.” I agree with you on that and still see women as overly sexualized or fetishized in theatre and film. Do you see this changing in the art world in that regard, or do you see more of the same? 

AB: I haven’t really seen much change in my short lifetime. I feel like the ways in which women become diminished has actually gotten more and more sophisticated and underhanded. I think this goes beyond just the usual objectification, which is still hugely pervasive. Yes, women have been handed more basic human rights and have much more opportunities than in the past - however - I don’t think we as humans have evolved as quickly as our laws. I still think that men’s opinions (whether in the real world or in the art world) are taken more seriously. I feel like being a woman artist (and especially a gay woman artist) - automatically colors my work in a way so it must be seen with that lens. Whereas a white man has the privilege of having his work seen as just his work. 

Perhaps if I had chosen to work under a different name, or even anonymously, I could have avoided this problem. But why should I have to hide myself from my viewers to be taken more seriously? 

I guess I didn’t really answer this question…. but it sent me off on this tangent (laughs). 

DDD:  You did. Thank you. It seems that your work would make for a fantastic short film. Have you ever worked in that or any other mediums? 

AB: I have worked on storyboards for commercials and animations! But no, not on an actual film. I would love to work with an animator one day and see my drawings move. (Part 3/5)

DDD: You mentioned that “I intensely dislike the way that woman are often portrayed in popular culture, and try to fight that in my own work.” I agree with you on that and still see women as overly sexualized or fetishized in theatre and film. Do you see this changing in the art world in that regard, or do you see more of the same?

AB: I haven’t really seen much change in my short lifetime. I feel like the ways in which women become diminished has actually gotten more and more sophisticated and underhanded. I think this goes beyond just the usual objectification, which is still hugely pervasive. Yes, women have been handed more basic human rights and have much more opportunities than in the past - however - I don’t think we as humans have evolved as quickly as our laws. I still think that men’s opinions (whether in the real world or in the art world) are taken more seriously. I feel like being a woman artist (and especially a gay woman artist) - automatically colors my work in a way so it must be seen with that lens. Whereas a white man has the privilege of having his work seen as just his work.

Perhaps if I had chosen to work under a different name, or even anonymously, I could have avoided this problem. But why should I have to hide myself from my viewers to be taken more seriously?

I guess I didn’t really answer this question…. but it sent me off on this tangent (laughs).

DDD: You did. Thank you. It seems that your work would make for a fantastic short film. Have you ever worked in that or any other mediums?

AB: I have worked on storyboards for commercials and animations! But no, not on an actual film. I would love to work with an animator one day and see my drawings move. (Part 3/5)